I was just reading a recent article in the Guardian newspaper - an interview with Bernie Krausse. He's spent spent 40 years recording nature's sounds. But such is the rate of species and habitat loss that notices a striking difference and silence emerging, where there once were the most incredible sounds. Here's a snippet from the article:

  • "A great silence is spreading over the natural world even as the sound of man is becoming deafening," he writes in a new book, The Great Animal Orchestra. "Little by little the vast orchestra of life, the chorus of the natural world, is in the process of being quietened. There has been a massive decrease in the density and diversity of key vocal creatures, both large and small. The sense of desolation extends beyond mere silence. "If you listen to a damaged soundscape … the community [of life] has been altered, and organisms have been destroyed, lost their habitat or been left to re-establish their places in the spectrum. As a result, some voices are gone entirely, while others aggressively compete to establish a new place in the increasingly disjointed chorus." Hawaii, he says, is the extinction capital of the world. "In a couple of centuries since the islands were populated by Europeans, half the 140 bird species have disappeared. In Madagascar, 15 species of lemur, an elephant bird, a pygmy hippo and an estimated half of all the animals have gone extinct." Read in full here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/sep/03/bernie-krause-natural…